Cottage Cheese Alfredo

Cottage cheese alfredo. Tastes just like the real thing at a fraction of the calories!
Show of hands: who hates alfredo?

You.. there, in the back. GET OUT. You are but a robot amongst us, sent to destroy the empire.

The alfredo empire of deliciousness, that is. Uh.. I digress. Another show of hands: who loves the fat and calories in a bowl of creamy, rich fettuccine alfredo?

You.. there, in the back. GET OUT. I hate you for your metabolism.

Cottage cheese alfredo. Tastes just like the real thing at a fraction of the calories!
Alfredo has always been one of my favorite pasta sauces, but I tend to reserve it for a special occasion treat, due to the high amounts butter, cream, and cheese. And then… I found this. We typically associate cottage cheese with gummy bites at an assisted-living center or our tiny-ass dog Magnolia, whom we were instructed by the vet to feed cottage cheese mixed into her dry food so she’d put on some pounds (11, going on 12! But we still tell everyone she’s a week-old lab, for the sake of O’s masculinity). But think again, people! Blended with some other ingredients, it transforms into a luxurious, creamy sauce, at a fraction of the guilt and hippyness.

Cottage cheese alfredo. Tastes just like the real thing at a fraction of the calories!
But be warned. You might have to fend off dozens of requests a day for this stuff. I’m not lying.

The first time I made this, O ate his bowl–and subsequently licked the bowl clean–in total silence.

“He hates it,” I told myself. “Oh well. It’s still so much better for us, and I think it’s pretty damn delicious.”

An hour later.

“That was the best thing I’ve ever had,” O spouts, unprovoked. “Can we have it again tomorrow?”

No. No, we can’t. But “tomorrow”, he repeated the question. I repeated the answer. I need variety, dammit! No matter how good something is. The day after “tomorrow”, he repeated the question, and I, the answer. And so on, until I caved and whipped it up the next week. And then the week after that as a sorry-I’m-going-to-St.-Louis-without-you-and-leaving-you-to-fend-for-yourself dish. I’m not exaggerating in claims of how insanely good this stuff is.

Cottage cheese alfredo. Tastes just like the real thing at a fraction of the calories!
I pretty much followed a Food.com recipe to the T, adding a bit of dried basil and oregano for funzies. This would be frightfully good with a hefty helping of Cajun seasoning mixed in, and perhaps some shrimp, red bell peppers, and chicken, for a Cajun alfredo. Stir in some fresh spinach and tomatoes for a nice Florentine (plus the tomatoes, for propriety’s sake). It’s delicious just as it is!

Cottage cheese alfredo. Tastes just like the real thing at a fraction of the calories!
Make this. But after you’ve served it to those hungry mouths, remember.. I told you so.

Cottage Cheese Alfredo
Serves 4
A rich, creamy alternative to heavy alfredo, made with cottage cheese. Tastes just like the real thing.. or maybe even better!
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
25 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
25 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup milk (skim for low-fat)
  2. 1/2 cup cottage cheese (low-fat cottage cheese to make this recipe low-fat)
  3. 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  4. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  5. 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  6. 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder, or more to taste
  7. 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese or Romano cheese
  8. dried basil, to taste
  9. dried oregano, to taste
Instructions
  1. Put all ingredients, except basil, into food processor or blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Pour mixture in small saucepan and add basil and oregano. Cook over medium-low heat until heated through and smooth. Add more basil, oregano, salt, or pepper (or other seasonings), to taste.
  3. Let cook on very low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add cooked pasta right before serving and let soak in for a couple minutes. Add spinach, other veggies or meats now, and serve!
Adapted from Food.com
Adapted from Food.com
The Stylist Quo http://thestylistquo.com/

Bolognese

Bolognese // The Stylist QuoI first made this bolognese for my mother for mother’s day. Dear old mum loves a good bowl of spaghetti and meat sauce, but my dad always makes this weird batch of spaghetti sauce à la whatever-he-likes, which tends to be what no one.. else.. likes. It’s an odd thing. Making a giant pot of bolognese for yourself isn’t that satisfying, either, so it was the perfect dish to make to say “Sorry we were totally on vacation during Mother’s Day! We brought you this shiny thing!”

This bolognese sauce is the perfect workhorse sauce: rich, meaty, and full of flavor. It gets a remarkable depth from the long simmer time, but it’s not so long that it’s a full day of a recipe. This bolognese is a perfect weekend dish–hearty and comforting!

I can’t speak to how seriously authentic it is, as I didn’t really eat much bolognese when I was in Italy. The original recipe claims it’s authentic, but, since the author formulated it to his tastes after traveling around Italy, I don’t know if it has Italian grandmama status. Does it matter? NO! It’s seriously awesome. But since we’re doing part of our honeymoon in Italy, I’ll take it upon myself to find out just how authentic the taste is. Someone‘s got to struggle for their art, right? I’ll bear that brunt, carry that cross. For you.

For you..

Bolognese // The Stylist Quo

You might not be totally sold on the addition of milk at the end of simmering, but trust me on this! It balances the acidity of the tomatoes beautifully, without making the sauce exactly “creamy”. I used all Italian sausage this go-round, because I halved the original recipe, which calls for both ground pork and ground sausage,  and didn’t want to use half packages of ground pork and sauce, but you can switch it up if you like and use a mix you love.

I made my own pasta here, too. Feeling ambitious? It’s not nearly as difficult or time-consuming as you might think! Try David Lebovitz’s recipe before I get around to posting my version.

Bolognese Sauce
Serves 4
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
40 min
Cook Time
2 hr
Total Time
2 hr 40 min
Prep Time
40 min
Cook Time
2 hr
Total Time
2 hr 40 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 slices bacon
  2. 1/2 medium onion, chopped fine
  3. 1/2 stalk celery, chopped fine
  4. 1/2 large carrot, chopped fine
  5. 2 - 4 cloves garlic, minced
  6. 2 tablespoons butter
  7. 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  8. 1 lb ground Italian sausage
  9. 4 ounces beef stock
  10. 1/2 cup dry white wine
  11. 1 (14 ounce) can Italian style crushed tomatoes (or plain, but make sure they're CRUSHED, not diced)
  12. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  13. 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  14. 1/2 - 3/4 teaspoon rubbed sage
  15. 1/2 tablespoon oregano
  16. 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  17. 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  18. 1/2 cup milk (avoid skim [milk water...])
  19. pasta for 4
Instructions
  1. In a medium heavy-bottomed pot, heat butter and olive oil over medium heat until butter begins to froth. Add onion, celery, carrot, garlic, and bacon. Cook until onions are translucent, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  2. Remove bacon and skim out most fat. Chop lean portions of bacon in small pieces and return to pot. Add ground sausage and cook until sausage is browned, breaking up.
  3. Raise heat and add wine and beef broth. Cook sauce until wine and consomme are mostly evaporated, or at least reduced by half. Turn heat down to simmer and add oregano, salt, pepper, sage, red pepper flakes, and nutmeg. Let cook for approximately 20 minutes.
  4. Add crushed tomatoes and bring heat to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer very slowly, partially covered, for about 2 to 4 hours, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. The longer the better!
  5. About 5 to 10 minutes before serving, add milk. Combine freshly cooked pasta and sauce over very low heat and allow pasta to soak up the sauce, a few minutes.
Adapted from Food.com
Adapted from Food.com
The Stylist Quo http://thestylistquo.com/

That’s some serious amore.

The slightly extended family came over for dinner tonight, with a “special guest.” Ooooh.

Except when my mother said that, she didn’t mean me, even though none of that slightly extended family has seen me since I moved home. She meant my vegetarian aunt. And did she make something vegetarian for that vegetarian “special guest”? No! Did I? Yes!

(Don’t mind my sneaky bit of Italian sausage I snuck from the meat sauce’s pan…)
… 

Read More »